Displaced Persons Camps

ROSER 1Whilst the end of the Second World War gave many people cause for celebration, the nightmare was not over for hundreds of thousands of victims of Nazi oppression. Most had been liberated from concentration camps, but were malnourished and often ill. They had lost their homes, possessions, and often most of their family. Their displacement posed a problem for the authorities, who were unsure as to how to accommodate them in a newly-freed Europe.
The original plan was to repatriate these displaced people to their countries of origin. Military missions of the Allied nations attached to the British, French and American armies assisted with sorting and classifying displaced persons of their own nationality. This was taken over in October 1945 by the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), but the military continued to assist with transportation, supplies and security. Over six million displaced persons were repatriated by the end of 1945, but not everyone was able to return home, and many did not want to. Therefore, accommodation for displaced persons was set up wherever possible – military barracks, schools, private homes etc. – and many camps became permanent homes for victims of Nazi persecution. Camps did, however, begin to close as refugees found new homes or made their way to other places. The last displaced persons camp was closed in Wels in 1959.

DISPLACED PERSONS
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

ORT and the Displaced Persons Camps
Survivors in Post-War Europe
ORT
The Association for the Promotion of Skilled Trades (ORT) is a non-profit global Jewish organization that promotes education and training in over 100 countries. As many as 80,000 Jews passed through ORT traning projects immediately after the war- ranging from young Jews who had been deprived of any education during the war and older artisans who needed skills to build their lives in the new countries.

ORT and the Displaced Persons Camps
ORT and Rehabilitation
ORT

Displaced Persons
Jewish Virtual Library
Extensive links

Explore DP Camps
ORT
Map and extensive information about DP camps across Europe

DISPLACED PERSONS: ADMINISTRATION
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
Wikipedia
(UNRRA) was an international relief agency, largely dominated by the United States but representing 44 nations. Founded in 1943, it became part of the United Nations in 1945, was especially active in 1945 and 1946. Its purpose was to “plan, co-ordinate, administer or arrange for the administration of measures for the relief of victims of war in any area under the control of any of the United Nations through the provision of food, fuel, clothing, shelter and other basic necessities, medical and other essential services

POSTWAR REFUGEE CRISIS AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE STATE OF ISRAEL
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Harrison Report
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
This report, which sharply criticized the Army for its treatment of Jewish survivors, was the work of Earl G. Harrison, Dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School. The report called for the creation of all-Jewish camps and the evacuation of Jews from Germany, but also mentioned that Jews were being kept under American armed guard, behind barbed wire, and in former concentration camps

Harrison Report – Letter to President Truman
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Truman’s Letter Regarding the Harrison Report on the Treatment of Displaced Jews
Jewish Virtual Library

THE POST-HOLOCAUST WORLD AND PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN:
THE HARRISON REPORT AND IMMIGRATION LAW AND POLICY
HARRY REICHER
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA LAW SCHOOL

Harrison Report: Post-World War II Bombshell
Penn Law Journal

Earl G. Harrison
Wikipedia

Map:
Camps for Displaced Persons in Germany and Austria
Jewish Virtual Library

 

 

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